Unpainted Wood- Beyond Wood Trim

Stained or unpainted wood trim has been a go- to decorating idea for homes and spaces for generations. Recently the use of horizontal wood paneling has been gaining traction speedily. Sometimes shiplap or nickel gapped, the wood is often reclaimed in keeping with that growing trend. Sometimes it's pickled or has a translucent stain applied to allow grain to show. The result is occasionally sleek ( think cherry or walnut or fir) but more often very rustic and  organic looking and works for properties as divergent as beach homes, lofts and country homes. The color of the wood dictates what paint colors look best with it. Often white is chosen as it allows the color and grain of the wood to be the star of the room. Depending on the color of the wood however, walls painted other than white can look terrific. Below are some great examples of horizontal, unpainted wood paneling. Thanks to all the great designers on Houzz whose photos I used.
Horizontal Wood paneling

Horizontal Wood Paneling

Horizontal Paneling

Horizontal Paneling: Pickled, Stained or Natural

Wooden beams, slats or paneling

Wooden beams, slats or paneling

     

Soul Grabbing Color

It was a snowy day in Upstate New York today. I spent the day on my computer, breaking often to stare at the progress the snow was making on the hills around me. I was fascinated by the sumac tree I can see from my office window: the drupes are emergency food for birds and the tree was covered in robins. It was a perfectly lovely, productive day. Then I discovered the work of David Hornung..... Absolutely stunning paintings whose impact stems from the simple primitive forms and his mastery of color. I have no words...Just look.
David Hornung

David Hornung

David Hornung

David Hornung

David Hornung

David Hornung

In his own words: "The subjects I like to paint are ordinary—walls, ladders, rocks, trees, simple buildings, garden tools, ropes, bones, rickety tables, and the occasional figure. I like them because they lend themselves to the kind of emblematic mode of representation that I prefer, and because they can appear timeless."..."My paintings depict carefully constructed scenes, but the space in them is inconsistent, the light can come from several directions at once, and the narratives hinted at are vague, almost accidental. Color, both for its evocation of light and space as well as its psychological suggestions, and the particular quality of a brushed surface are also of primary importance. When painting, I am always struggling to reconcile a classical need for formal rectitude with the equal truth of accident and awkwardness. Objects I choose to represent can appear volumetric or flat, graphic or painterly, because I crave the tension this creates in the “read” of the image." Bravo David Hornung